American Pullman Loaf, also called Sandwich Bread circa 1920

A Pullman Dining Car in the late 19th century. The bread on the table, right front, has rounded edges, so, it is not a Pullman Loaf. The perfectly rectangular mold-baked pullman loaf is stored efficiently and cleanly in the limited space of the train carriage kitchen. The Pullman Loaf , also often published under the … Continue reading American Pullman Loaf, also called Sandwich Bread circa 1920

Recipes for Bread History Seminar #14, Domestication of the Bread Grains

An Imagined Early Bread Natufian & Pre Pottery Neolithic The first breads were made by Natufian hunter gatherers around 14,000 years ago. Naatufians are the people in southwest Asia that we know for sure first utilized bread grains for bread. We know this because we have proof in the form of archeological remains. Natufians, and … Continue reading Recipes for Bread History Seminar #14, Domestication of the Bread Grains

Bread Recipes from the Assize of Bread, Late Medieval England for the Thursday, October 8, Bread History Seminar

Note: Please choose which of the three breads you will make for the Seminar/Workshop on October 8, 2020. Please weigh out the ingredients. We will mix and talk about the recipe after the formal lecture is completed. The English Assize laws dating to the Late Medieval Period, the 1100s and the 1200s, were very simple, … Continue reading Bread Recipes from the Assize of Bread, Late Medieval England for the Thursday, October 8, Bread History Seminar

Nicolas de Bonnefons, Recipe for Rubel Seminar #11

Nicolas de Bonnefons wrote two fabulous books in the 1650s. One, the Jardiner Francois, was translated by John Evelyn and published under the title, The French Gardiner. I have written an annotated edition that I will publish -- one day. Bonnefons followed up the gardening book with a book called Les Delices de la Compagne. … Continue reading Nicolas de Bonnefons, Recipe for Rubel Seminar #11

Recipes for Seminar #10: Sourdough

Most of the Seminar #10 on sourdough is being led by Karl de Smedt, founding curator of the Puratos Sourdough Library. He is suggesting a pancake and/or waffle recipe for the Thursday, July 16, 2020 Seminar/Workshop. "So we hewed off some of the inside logs of the cabin, and soon had a roaring fire. With … Continue reading Recipes for Seminar #10: Sourdough

July 9 English French Bread Seminar/Workshop with William Rubel

English French bread was almost invariably rasped. Even into the 20th century. This page provides the recipe and mise en place information for participants in my Thursday Seminar/Workshop #9 on English French Bread. If you are registered for the Seminar I suggest you also register at my Facebook group: Bread History and Practice. That is … Continue reading July 9 English French Bread Seminar/Workshop with William Rubel

Recipe for bread by Louis Liger, 1711

This is the recipe and mise en place for my Zoom bread history seminar/workshop for Thursday, June 25, 2020, 9am Pacific Time. Please have the ingredients weighed out for the start of the seminar. The Ingredients for the First Build This is the Mise en Place for the Final Build. I have increased the water … Continue reading Recipe for bread by Louis Liger, 1711

Mise en Place for Flatbread Seminar/Workshop #6

This week I am introducing flatbreads through an introduction to the history of bread. This is just an introduction to flatbreads. I am planning further sessions just on flatbreads led by people who are more expert than I am. It looks like we will be able to organize a session on flatbreads from the Indian … Continue reading Mise en Place for Flatbread Seminar/Workshop #6

Making Pine Bark Bread

In most of Europe, bread made from bark was a famine food. It was more regularly eaten Europe's far North. The "bark" in bark bread is actually the cambium¬†layer that grows under the bark. Pine was a common tree to use for bark breads. The¬†cambium layer is pealed from the tree, dried, and ground into … Continue reading Making Pine Bark Bread