The Miller’s Thumb

Stone milling is the art of grinding grain into a meal, and then through sifting and re-grinding (and re-sifting), refining the product into the quality flour one wants for the finished product. While sifting determines the final quality of flour, the ratios of what is produced (and thus profit) depends heavily on the precision with which … Continue reading The Miller’s Thumb

A Website with 7,000+ Watercolors of Fruit!

It is blackberry season and I just came across this amazing USDA (United States Department of Agriculture) website containing images in high resolution scans of of 7,300 fruits (mostly apples). Enjoy! Here is an article, The collection of pomological watercolors at the United States Department of Agriculture, published in 1982 in the Journal of Botanical … Continue reading A Website with 7,000+ Watercolors of Fruit!

Making Pine Bark Bread

In most of Europe, bread made from bark was a famine food. It was more regularly eaten Europe's far North. The "bark" in bark bread is actually the cambium layer that grows under the bark. Pine was a common tree to use for bark breads. The cambium layer is pealed from the tree, dried, and ground into … Continue reading Making Pine Bark Bread

Starting out with Wild Greens

Dandelion and wild lettuces are common in the Northern Hemisphere. During the growing seasons it is pretty impossible, even in a big city, to not pass dandelion and wild lettuce. But, I know for myself, that even though I love foraging that there is often some kind of impediment, like a force field, that seems to keep … Continue reading Starting out with Wild Greens

A Fine Basic Madeleine Recipe from 1893

Who doesn't love a madeleine?  The recipe I've used since I first bought the New Larousse Gastonomique (1977) is its recipe for plain madeleine.  that makes it almost 40 years since I bought the book new when it came out. What I like about the New Larousse Gastonomique recipe is its utter simplicity. It's a poundcake. You mix … Continue reading A Fine Basic Madeleine Recipe from 1893

Amanita Muscaria Toxicity and Vinegar Preserved Mushrooms

A look at an historic mushroom text. "In 1879 mushrooms were exported from Japan to the value of 243,440 yens. The yen is equal to 99.7 cents. Among the northeastern tribes of Asia fungi are largely used as food. One species, when pounded, forms their snuff, while another, the Fly Agaric, which is utilized in … Continue reading Amanita Muscaria Toxicity and Vinegar Preserved Mushrooms

Zadock Steele, starving, eats too much bread.

Zadock Steele  was captured by Mohawk Indians allied with the British in a raid in Vermont in 1780. It was called the Royalton raid. Zadock was transferred to British custody and eventually escapes. Starving, he and a companion are taken in by a "poor widow".  In this short scene he  describes over eating what she … Continue reading Zadock Steele, starving, eats too much bread.

The History of the Garden Dandelion

Firstly, I love dandelion. It is one of the most delicious vegetables. Why dandelion is not a standard on the grocery shelf along with other tiller weeds, like lettuce, chicory, and cabbage is difficult for me to understand. But, there it is. A delicious wild green that remains largely wild. The history of the dandelion … Continue reading The History of the Garden Dandelion